Posted by | December 30, 2007 21:03 | Filed under: Top Stories

But the surge, worked, right?


The second half of 2007 saw violence drop dramatically in Iraq, but the progress came at a high price: The year was the deadliest for the U.S. military since the 2003 invasion, with 899 troops killed…
Britain, the main U.S. coalition partner in Iraq, is gradually drawing down its forces and other allies, including Poland and Australia, are contemplating full-scale withdrawals in the coming year…
At least 3,902 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the war. Of those, at least 3,175 died as a result of hostile action, according to the military’s numbers…
Iraqi civilian deaths also peaked in May with 2,155 killed. That fell to 718 in November and 710 in December. For the year, 18,610 Iraqis were killed. In 2006, the only other full year an AP count has been tallied, 13,813 civilians were killed.
Those numbers paint an increasingly optimistic picture, but James Carafano, a security expert with the Heritage Foundation think-tank in Washington, D.C., warned dangers lurk.
“The number of people who have the power to turns things around appears to be dwindling,” he said regarding extremists. “But there are still people in Iraq that could string together a week of really bad days.”
While that might not mean a return to the bloodiest moments of the Iraq war, Carafano said it could seriously rattle the Iraqi government as it tries to bring about some form of political reconciliation in 2008, a key to long-term security.
“People have to be really careful about over-promising that this is an irreversible trend – I think it is a soft trend,” he said of the declining violence.

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Copyright 2007 Liberaland
By: Alan

Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.