Posted by | December 29, 2008 12:04 | Filed under: Top Stories

Newsweek recounts the string of events that could have BushCo facing legal jeopardy for prisoner abuse curing TGWOT.


In early December, in a highly unusual move, a federal court in New York agreed to rehear a lawsuit against former Attorney General John Ashcroft brought by a Canadian citizen, Maher Arar. (Arar was a victim of the administration’s extraordinary rendition program: he was seized by U.S. officials in 2002 while in transit through Kennedy Airport and deported to Syria, where he was tortured.) Then, on Dec. 15, the Supreme Court revived a lawsuit against Donald Rumsfeld by four Guantánamo detainees alleging abuse there-a reminder that the court, unlike the White House, will extend Constitutional protections to foreigners at Gitmo. Finally, in the same week the Senate Armed Service Committee, led by Carl Levin and John McCain, released a blistering report specifically blaming key administration figures for prisoner mistreatment and interrogation techniques that broke the law. The bipartisan report reads like a brief for the prosecution-calling, for example, Rumsfeld’s behavior a “direct cause” of abuse.

 

With these high level charges being a first in US history and Cheney having recently admitted that he approved waterboarding, there is increasing speculation that there will be blanket pardons offered as Bush exits.


One possible scenario involved creating a panel to examine possible war crimes.

 

Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch, says that although “we know what went on,” “knowledge and a change in practices are not sufficient: there must be acknowledgment and repudiation as well.” He favors the creation of a nonpartisan commission of inquiry with a professional staff and subpoena power, calling it “the only way to definitively repudiate this ugly chapter in U.S. history.”

 

Another possiblity would be international sanctions.

 

Michael Ratner, president of the Center for Constitutional Rights and author of “The Trial of Donald Rumsfeld,” points out that over 20 countries now have universal jurisdiction laws that would allow them to indict U.S. officials for torture if America doesn’t do it itself. A few such cases were attempted in recent years but were dropped, reportedly under U.S. pressure. Now the Obama administration may be less likely to stand in their way. This doesn’t mean it will extradite Cheney and Co. to stand trial abroad. But at the very least, the threat of such suits could soon force Bush aides to think twice before buying plane tickets. “The world is getting smaller for these guys,” says Ratner, “and they’ll have to check with their lawyers very carefully before they travel.” Jail time it isn’t—but it may be some justice nonetheless.

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Copyright 2008 Liberaland
By: Alan

Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.