Posted by | October 12, 2009 14:52 | Filed under: Top Stories

Old Testament scholar Ellen Van Wolde, of Radbaud University in the Netherlands,  says the first sentence of Genesis, “In the beginning God created heaven and earth,” has been mistranslated.

She claims she has carried out fresh textual analysis that suggests the writers of the great book never intended to suggest that God created the world — and in fact the Earth was already there when he created humans and animals.


She said she eventually concluded the Hebrew verb “bara”, which is used in the first sentence of the book of Genesis, does not mean “to create” but to “spatially separate”.


The first sentence should now read “in the beginning God separated the Heaven and the Earth”


According to Judeo-Christian tradition, God created the Earth out of nothing.


Prof Van Wolde, who once worked with the Italian academic and novelist Umberto Eco, said her new analysis showed that the beginning of the Bible was not the beginning of time, but the beginning of a narration.


She said: “It meant to say that God did create humans and animals, but not the Earth itself.”


So, the earth, including water and sea monsters, already existed, and God then created humans and animals, says the prof.

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By: Alan

Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.