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Palin Tea Party Speech: Long On Attack, Short On Policy

Sarah Palin’s speech at the  expensive tea party convention in Nashville was more an attack on President Obama than a blueprint for what conservatives need to do to moving forward. To flag-waving, cheers, an standing ovations, Palin pleased the crowd with her broadsides.

Noting his party’s dismal showing in elections since Obama moved into the White House a year ago with talk of hope and promises of change, Palin asked the gathering: “How’s that hope-y, change-y stuff workin’ out for you?”

While this was opportunity to establish herself as a serious, policy-focused potential candidate of the future, her rhetoric seemed more intended to cater to the crowd.

Palin talked of limited government, strict adherence to the Constitution, and the “God-given right” of freedom. She said the “fresh, young and fragile” movement is the future of American politics because it’s “a ground-up call to action” to both major political parties to change how they do business.

“America is ready for another revolution!” she told the gathering.

The $100,000 paid to Palin bought more anti-Obama screeds:

Palin ribbed Obama for Democratic losses in New Jersey and Virginia governor’s races last fall and in a Massachusetts Senate race last month, saying: “When you’re 0-3 you’d better stop lecturing and start listening.”

On foreign policy and national security, Palin said he had “misguided thinking” and a pre-Sept. 11 mindset.

Palin’s attack mode included the line, “We need a commander-in-chief not a professor of law standing at a lectern.”  I don’t know about you, but having someone who is fluent enough in the Constitution to teach is someone I don’t mind having in the White House, nor is that qualification and having the ability to be commander-in-chief mutually exclusive.

About Alan

Alan Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.

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