Posted by | March 31, 2010 11:28 | Filed under: Top Stories

Concerned about evolving from “the party of no” to “the party of never” some Republicans are beginning to realize that running on the issue of repeal is not such a good idea.

Repeal is politically and legally unlikely, and grass-roots activists may feel disillusioned by a failed crusade. More important, say strategists from both parties, a fiercely repeal-the-bill stance might prove far less popular in a general election than in a conservative-dominated GOP primary, especially in states such as Illinois and California.

It always helps if you run on a positive message of change. Worked for Obama.

Republican strategist Kevin Madden said the repeal message is “a call to action” that excites many conservative voters, who will be important in November. But the risk of talking only about repeal, he said, “is you only define your position by what you’re against.”

Madden said GOP candidates should advocate “repeal and reform,” which will let them discuss alternative ways to control health care expenses, quality and access. Because an actual repeal is unlikely, he said, candidates should not get bogged down in the mechanics of how it might work, and focus instead on issues such as costs.

“The legislative track is largely finished,” Madden said.

Now all the GOP  has to do is figure out what it is for.

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Copyright 2010 Liberaland
By: Alan

Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.