Posted by | September 20, 2010 11:30 | Filed under: Top Stories

Frail from chemotherapy and suffering from the same malady that killed his father, esophageal cancer, renowned atheist Christopher Hitchens is not participating in a prayer day in his honor.

The way the English-born Hitchens sees it, the people praying for him break down into three basic groups: those who seem genuinely glad he’s suffering and dying from cancer; those who want him to become a believer in their religious faith; and those who are asking God to heal him.

Hitchens has no use for that first group. “‘To hell with you’ is the response to the ones who pray for me to go to hell,” Hitchens told AP.

He’s ruling out the idea of a deathbed change of heart: “‘Thanks but no thanks’ is the reply to those who want me to convert and recognize a divinity or deity.”

It’s that third group — people who are asking God for Hitchens’ healing — that causes Hitchens to choose his words even more carefully than normal. Are those prayers OK? Are they helpful?

“I say it’s fine by me, I think of it as a nice gesture. And it may well make them feel better, which is a good thing in itself,” says Hitchens.

However, the prayers don’t make him feel any better.

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Copyright 2010 Liberaland
By: Alan

Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.