Posted by | November 24, 2010 14:49 | Filed under: Top Stories

Former President Jimmy Carter says the United States and North Korea should talk directly. There is a precedent, with which Carter was involved.

The North has threatened armed conflict before. Nearly eight years ago, I wrote on this page about how in June 1994 President Kim Il Sung expelled International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors and proclaimed that spent fuel rods could be reprocessed into plutonium. Kim threatened to destroy Seoul if increasingly severe sanctions were imposed on his nation.

Desiring to resolve the crisis through direct talks with the United States, Kim invited me to Pyongyang to discuss the outstanding issues. With approval from President Bill Clinton, I went, and reported the positive results of these one-on-one discussions to the White House. Direct negotiations ensued in Geneva between a U.S. special envoy and a North Korean delegation, resulting in an “agreed framework” that stopped North Korea’s fuel-cell reprocessing and restored IAEA inspection for eight years.

Since the Clinton administration there have been six-party talks, but not a bilateral approach. Carter has a sense of what can be accomplished:

Pyongyang has sent a consistent message that during direct talks with the United States, it is ready to conclude an agreement to end its nuclear programs, put them all under IAEA inspection and conclude a permanent peace treaty to replace the “temporary” cease-fire of 1953. We should consider responding to this offer. The unfortunate alternative is for North Koreans to take whatever actions they consider necessary to defend themselves from what they claim to fear most: a military attack supported by the United States, along with efforts to change the political regime.

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Copyright 2010 Liberaland
By: Alan

Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.