Brain Pacemakers Could Zap Alzheimer’s

Testing is in the early stages.

The new approach is called deep brain stimulation, or DBS. While it won’t attack Alzheimer’s root cause either, “maybe we can make the brain work better,” he said.

Implanting electrodes into the brain isn’t new.

Between 85,000 and 100,000 people around the world have had DBS to block the tremors of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. The continuous jolts quiet overactive nerve cells, with few side effects. Scientists also are testing whether stimulating other parts of the brain might help lift depression or curb appetite among the obese.

About Alan

Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.

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