‘We’ve Just Been Stealing, Stealing, Stealing From Our Children, And It’s Shocking’

That’s what Jane Goodall has to say.

“When I first came to Africa and I flew over Kilimanjaro, even in the height of the summer there was a great cap of snow. The snows of Kilimanjaro,” she recalled.

“I just read the other day that we should rather be talking about the dusts of Kilimanjaro. That is just one signal and this is all around the world that the glaciers are melting,” she went on.

For Goodall, one of the world’s leading chimpanzee experts, “something has gone wrong” in the relationship between man and the planet.

“We’ve just been stealing, stealing, stealing from our children, and it’s shocking. But is it true that there’s nothing that can be done? No absolutely not,” she goes on, explaining how her latest project, Roots and Shoots, began.

The project, which now spans 132 countries, began in Tanzania, where Goodall, the first scientist to name the animals she was studying — a practice that sparked controversy, started observing chimpanzees, with just 12 students from nine different high schools.

Roots and Shoots is aimed at sensitising young people to the importance of the environment and fauna.

“Young people are influencing their parents, they are influencing their teachers, they grow up to become teachers and parents, they grow up to go into business, to become politicians,” Goodall said.

About Alan

Alan Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.

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