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Joe Biden Stakes Ground Left Of Hillary For 2016 Run

Joe Biden gave what is being described as a “populist” and “revival-type” speech to South Carolina Democrats.

One attendee told CNN he gave an “Elizabeth Warren-type speech” blasting income inequality.

Biden has been courting liberal voters as he prepares for a possible run against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, though many Democrats don’t think he’d run against her.

He did not mention his own presidential ambitions in the speech but multiple sources described it as “populist” and high-energy, according to CNN.

“He said we have some of the most productive workers in the world, but corporations are more concerned about their stockholders than they are about their employees,” one attendee said. “He talked about how the fruits of labor go to stockholders, rather than to the people who are producing it. That the people making the money in this country are the corporations.”

Another attendee described it as “a stem-winding, almost revival-type speech.”

It’s clear that Joe Biden is staking his ground to the left of Hillary Clinton with a populist message. He appears to want to come off as a non-corporatist Democrat in a bid to hug to the left as we head toward 2016.

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Alan Alan Colmes is the publisher of Liberaland.

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  • fahvel

    Might be interesting if Warren decides not to try -Hillary is just old school same old same old.

    • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

      Elizabeth Warren made it clear that she won’t run for president in 2016 — but, on the other hand, she hasn’t ruled out accepting the VP spot. And Bill Maher already is clamoring for a Clinton-Warren ticket.

      • Elliot J. Stamler

        Bad idea….two women…a political negative realistically. Gotta face facts. There are still some people-and not all men either-who are reluctant to vote for a women president to start with. Dumb but it’s how things are. We’ve got to keep eyes on the prize..keeping the White House and keeping THEM out of it.

        • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

          Is a Clinton-Warren ticket REALLY that bad — especially if the GOP ticket ends up being Cruz-Perry or Perry-Cruz?

    • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

      Elizabeth Warren made it clear that she won’t run for president in 2016 — but, on the other hand, she hasn’t ruled out accepting the VP spot. And Bill Maher already is clamoring for a Clinton-Warren ticket.

  • Ken_H

    Hillary is the libs Bob Dole. They all claim respect for her but nobody really wants her as their standard bearer.

    • Elliot J. Stamler

      Really–how would you know? 85% of Democrats want her. I love Joe Biden and in fact supported him in his two abortive nomination runs but in plain fact Sec. Clinton is much more electable and I don’t want to see, God forbid, Pres. Cruz or Rubio or Huckabee or Perry or (gasp) Bush (as if the first two weren’t bad enough.)

      • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

        Hillary Clinton’s age and health might very well preclude her from making another run for the White House. She’ll be 68 in 2016 and who’s to say that she won’t have another major health scare between now and then? Frankly, I’d rather see New York Governor Andrew Cuomo run for president.

        • Elliot J. Stamler

          Firstly Skeeter, she won’t run if there is a health problem and she will as do all candidates have to present a health exam report to our American people. As to age..remember Pres. Reagan. Age brings wisdom and experience…you’ll know that when you reach her or my (even older) age. As to Gov. Cuomo, I am a New Yorker—he is not ready to run for president-he will be smashingly reelected this year and has been a surprisingly better governor than his father. But again, I want to keep THEM out of the White House above all else and I will support whomever is best positioned to do that-and that is Sec. Clinton. This is a political fact of life.

          • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

            Don’t let my photo avatar fool you: I’m already 61. I, too, am a New York native, but I left the “Big Apple” in 1981 because I could no longer cope with its soaring cost of living — nor with its racially-polarized politics.

          • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

            Don’t let my photo avatar fool you: I’m already 61. I, too, am a New York native, but I left the “Big Apple” in 1981 because I could no longer cope with its soaring cost of living — nor with its racially-polarized politics.

            • Elliot J. Stamler

              It’s still frightfully expensive, Skeeter, but the racial polarization has substantially abated. For all his faults (and I never voted for him) Bloomberg did conciliatory things to calm the city after the 8 year tyranny of “America’s Mayor” Benito Mussolini Giuliani, who, to be put it bluntly, did not like blacks.

              • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

                Actually, as divisive as Giuliani was, he pales in comparison to Ed Koch. It was during Koch’s tenure as mayor that New York became a racial time bomb ready to explode.

                • Elliot J. Stamler

                  I sharply disagree with you. Koch was no racist and having lived here when he was in office I frankly agreed with him in his position he would not be intimidated by black demagogues of whom this city had plenty-people like Sonny Carson, Al Sharpton, Herbert Daughtry, etc. That is in contradistinction to Giuliani who was motivated not as Koch was by standing up to ALL racists, black as well as white, but by a clear ‘tho unacknowledged dislike of blacks. That was why Giuliani in his entire administration had exactly ONE black commissioner, Rudy Washington, who has publicly declared he would try to reason with Giuliani on racial matters.

                  • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

                    Koch lost the 1981 Democratic mayoral primary to David Dinkins — who went on to become New York’s first black mayor — because Koch proved to be far too divisive. Giuliani, a Republican, was term-limited out of office in 2001, despite a huge groundswell of support for him in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The amendment to the City Charter that limited mayors to two terms was passed in the wake of Koch’s tenure. I therefore stand by my comment that Koch was more divisive.

                    • Elliot J. Stamler

                      I must again disagree as both a NYC citizen during all of these cited times and one involved somewhat in politics. Giuliani’s groundswell of post 9/11 support was entirely understandable but believe me when I tell you on Sept. 10, 2011 he could not have been reelected. A majority of people in the city today have a dislike of him and would not vote for him which is one of the reasons he has never sought further elective office in this state. Yes I agree Koch was divisive but my point is that Koch was not in any way a racist…he was feisty and outspoken and not a bull—t artist like most politicians and the divisiveness you speak of was at least equally caused by his antagonists in the black community. I WAS HERE–I KNOW.

  • http://www.skeeterbitesreport.com SkeeterVT

    By the time the 2016 presidential campaign kicks into high gear with the Iowa Caucuses and the New Hampshire Primary, Joe Biden will be 73 years old. What makes ANYBODY think that Biden has any intention of making another run for White House at that age?