Posted by | July 23, 2015 17:00 | Filed under: Contributors Mark Quincy Adams Politics Religion


 


There is no separation of church and state for these Republican candidates for President. Although it seems they all act as if their ideas come from out of this world, Salon has determined that six candidates actually claim that their try for the White House is divinely inspired.

Scott Walker

The Wisconsin governor describes his presidential bid as “God’s plan,” explaining that his political decisions are guided by God, not voters.

John Kasich 

John Kasich waited for a message from God before becoming the 16th Republican to enter the presidential race this week. During an appearance on NBC’s  ”Meet The Press” earlier this year, Gov. Kasich explained to host Chuck Todd that he was exploring what the Lord wants before to deciding to enter the race

Ben Carson

“I believe God will make it clear to me if that’s something I’m supposed to do,” Ben Carson told Fox News last August, adding that he would run “if God grabbed him by the collar and asked him to run.”

Rick Perry

Perry told CNN, “I’m getting more and more comfortable every day that this is what I’ve been called to do. This is what America needs,” before telling a radio host he decided to run after a message from God.

Rick Santorum

Rick Santorum’s family also had a divine understanding of what compelled his presidential ambitions. “… We have prayed a lot about this decision, and we believe with all our hearts that this is what God wants.”

Mike Huckabee

Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee recently said “For me, this is not just a political or financial decision, it is a spiritual decision. You know, the only thing worse than not being elected president would be to be elected president without God’s blessing. I can’t think of a worse place in the world to be than in the Oval Office without God’s hand upon you.”


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Copyright 2015 Liberaland
By: Mark Quincy Adams

A proud 'pragmatic progressive' Mark Quincy Adams has been a political
talk show host and prolific pontificator since 1992. Find him on Facebook and Twitter @politicalglutton

  • Daniel Lovejoy

    Who’s God lying to?

  • NelsonRobison

    I’ve never figured out why Republicans can’t determine that their god, has told every one of these six that they’re supposed to be president. If there was an invisible deity, wouldn’t it be clear that one of these was supposed to hear from their god, and be the only one who’d be president? But that’s the vagaries of being a Christian in a land that is secular, you imagine that you’ve heard from this deity and he/she/it has told you that you’re going to be the president. We’ve got to start enforcing the separation of state and church!

    • The Original Just Me

      As for me, I ain’t voting for anybody that hears voices or has God speaking to them personally.

      • NelsonRobison

        As for me you’ve assessed the situation correctly. I won’t vote for someone who hears voices, whether or not those voices are “God” or not. I’m hoping that this election, the people who vote will have had enough to discern the difference between listening to your inner voice and hearing external voices as the Christian camp states they do.

        • The Original Just Me

          As for me. I would be happy if they would just listen a little bit to the regular people instead of the Nitwits.

    • burqa

      Indeed. It would take a lot of people to monitor the speech of 70% of the country and hiring them should take the unemployment rate down to zero!

  • cruisersailor

    Zeus did not tell any Republican to run for president!

    • whatthe46

      zeus needs to shove a lighting bolt up their asses is what.

  • Progressive Republican

    Apparently, God has a lesson to teach these cretins.

    • The Original Just Me

      Man was made in God’s image. Humans have a sense of humor, so God must have one also. So the reply to your post is; Naw, he’s just messing with them.

      • Progressive Republican

        Part of me concurs. Another part says that were I He, I would certainly try to teach those miscreants a lesson. Lord knows they could really use one. Or two more.

        • The Original Just Me

          Have you ever tried to educate a Rock ?

          • Progressive Republican

            It has certainly seemed like it sometimes.

            • The Original Just Me

              Sadly, I have lost some life long friends to the Tea Party Cliff. There is no return to reality once you go over that cliff.

              • Progressive Republican

                Indeed. Some years ago I talked to a lady whose bumpersticker “Support our troops, not those who mislead them” cost her and her husband some very long-time friends.

                The price of their huffing methane. How sad.

                • The Original Just Me

                  Huffing Methane, that is a new to me. I like it. One could also say Huffing Hydrogen Sulfide. That would really make the masses think you’re real sophisticated.

                  • Progressive Republican

                    Call it ‘H2S’. Make ’em look it up. ;-)

              • whatthe46

                ouch.

              • burqa

                That’s terrible.
                It is distressing to know how politics has divided people who love each other.

                My best friend since high school is pretty conservative, but has soured on Limbaugh and the other pundits and the Pee Party.
                We have a sort of arrangement where we avoid politics, but occasionally something comes up and one of us will have a good line or something.
                So the form in such cases is one of us makes a comment, the other replies, then each gets another comment followed by the person who brought it up changing the subject to something on neutral ground.
                We didn’t sit down like Kerry and the Iranians, we both saw that arguing got nothing done and harmed our friendship so we both sacrificed some and this is how it has shaken out.
                It’s also like that with some members of my family.

          • burqa

            I know what you mean. People get some erroneous notion into their heads and no matter how much evidence is presented, even when there is none to support their position, people will insist, for example, that the Founding Fathers were not Christians even though they said so and took many actions such as giving money and serving as vestrymen in churches that they supposedly were not members of and whose doctrine they objected to; or had joined a movement that did not yet exist.
            As for me, I have always enjoyed reading history and have the advantage of walking the same streets that Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Mason, Pendleton, Henry and Monroe walked. I have attended churches they attended. When one may walk the same streets, see many of the same sights, see their homes, churches and places of business, history becomes more living and real when it is read.

            • The Original Just Me

              I really appreciate your love of true history. Several times I have traveled to places where history actually took place just to soak it in. I really want some day to walk the Grounds at Gettysburg. I have read many accounts of peoples feelings while there. I love to read about the caricatures and people of history as well as the events that took place. Living in Sothern Idaho, I have become deeply interested in the individuals of early Mormon history. The religion is one thing but the people of that time are fascinating. Check out Oren Porter Rockwell. Read of his life and then relate it to the movie caricature of the sheriff in True Grit.

              • burqa

                Thank you for the kind words.
                I sure do love reading history, it goes back to when I was a child of 4 and was taught to read. I was surrounded by Marine World War II heroes whose deeds are listed in history books and could be in one room reading about them then walk in the next room and ask the person I was just reading about various questions.
                Where I live now is chock full of history. Washington, Madison, Mason and Monroe lived here or very close by. Jefferson was here often as was Pendleton.
                In posting about the homeless I have put up a number of posts praising the work done by St. George’s Episcopal on Princess Anne St. Patrick Henry’s father was the first minister there and George Washington was a regular attendee (presumably along with his mother, brother Charles and sister Betty, who married my direct ancestor, Fielding Lewis. There came a time when, during a service, a terrible noise was heard as the balcony in St. Georges began to move and panic ensued. People left through the doors and windows. Fortunately the balcony did not collapse. George Washington led the effort to replace the balcony, but some out there want people to think he had nothing to do with the church. Shoot, those bluffers ought to get a gander at Washington’s many surviving letters on Pohick Church up toward Mount Vernon. He and Mason took different sides on what side of Pohick Creek the church would be located on – an odd interest from a couple guys who were allegedly had forsworn their faith.
                I have posted links to churches attended by many Founding Fathers here that can be visited today.
                Part of my interest is also sparked by my genealogy, which I plunge into from time to time. I didn’t think I would find much new because there are footlockers full of this stuff, but sure enough I did after striking quite a goldmine in old Va. documents and other sources.
                I have lived in 3 different houses on Willis St., which is located right in the middle of where bodies lay in heaps in front of the stone wall on Sunken Rd. during the Battle of Fredericksburg. I am working on a house right next to the Wilderness battlefield – mighty nasty fighting in those woods. Chancellorsville, Brandy Station and Guinea Station were the sites of more combat during the War.
                Merriweather Lewis was from just down the road (and is also an ancestor of mine) and the magnificent Stratford Hall, home of the Lees is about a 40 minute drive away.
                Capt. John Smith came here and I seem to recall some fighting with the Patawomeck Indians or another related tribe.
                Working in construction doing historic restoration here, I have found all kinds of things in building I worked on.

                I am sure the Mormon history you mentioned is quite interesting. I wouldn’t get hung up on the religion, I’d let it slide and just try to learn. It makes a big difference when we can put it all together and imagine life rather than just what they did with this or that artifact.

                • The Original Just Me

                  I am going to give you an example of just how small this world is. I live in Southern Idaho. But, I have stood in front of the Stone Wall on Sunken Road in Fredericksburg. Our daughter and her first husband lived in Stafford, VA. He is still a Marine. She took us there during one of our visits. That was in the nineties. I live in a small canyon So. East of Twin Falls, ID. At the mouth of this canyon was a town called Rock Creek. If you remember the movies High Noon and The 3:10 to Yuma, those movies were based on a true story that happened in that town. There is a lot of history within ten miles of our home. Of course, there is history everywhere. The older I get the more interesting history becomes, especially when you can stand on the spot where it happened.

                  • burqa

                    That is quite a story. One time I was in Paris and was calling back home to arrange for a ride from the airport because I had decided to return. So first I got the overseas operator on the horn.
                    I told him I was calling America and he asked me which town. I said “Fredericksburg,” expecting him to ask which state because there are 20 F’burgs in the U.S. Instead, his reply was “I used to live there,” and he went on to describe Picker’s Supply, a well-known music store and the people he knew there and played music with.

                    I’ll bet you remember the Kirkland statue in front of the wall on Sunken Road. It has always moved me and so many others are a guy on a horse. Those graves on the hill behind there are nearly all Yankees, and not because such a high percentage from the Battle of Fredericksburg were buried there.
                    Those bodies are nearly all from the Wilderness, fought in ’64. After the battle many were buried in shallow graves and thousands of others just lay out there until 1866 when some Union general decided to give them a burial and they sent parties out to collect the yanks but they just left the bodies of the Confederates laying out in the open.

                    High Noon was always one of my favorite westerns and I’m ashamed to say I never saw The 3:10 from Yuma, but have heard it is outstanding.
                    I love those old stories, especially since truth is often stranger than fiction, as they say. One thing I think often gets omitted is how wild it really was when they were settling the West. There was no law or very little law enforcement in so much of the territories then and under other circumstances we have seen how readily people will abandon their civilized selves and become savages and cannibals. Also, in the 19th century, most of the people were poor, a few were in the middle class and a few more were wealthy.
                    One thing I have always wanted to read more about when I got the time is the role the U.S. Public Health Service played in draining swamps and other measures taken that brought an end to epidemics of diseases like yellow fever and malaria that used to wipe out large portions of various towns.